Mica Powder

Mica Powder can add a sparkle pearl luster color to fused glass projects.

It can also add depth and dimension to an otherwise flat piece of artwork.

The powder can be mixed and painted on a project, sprinkled straight onto the glass, or sprinkled onto a stamped image on a piece of glass.

This makes this powder a very versatile product.

Mica is compatible with all glass, except COE 33.

The colors hold up to 1400 degrees Fahrenheit, so it is suggested that it is fired to about 1380 degrees Fahrenheit.

This fine powder will stick to just about everything that it touches.

This high temperature mica mineral does not melt but sticks to the molten glass.

Therefore, it is suggested that you cap this powder with a clear piece of glass.

If not capped it can sometimes be rubbed off with your fingertip or washed off.

If just applying a fine layer, the clear glass cap can be skipped.

mica powder, Klyr-Fire, Aloe Vera

Try to avoid placing the mica powder near the edges of the glass.

Placing the product near the edges can cause the edge of the glass to pull inward, leaving uneven edges.

It can also create a channel and actually pour out of the groove after firing.

Try leaving at least a ¼ inch border of the glass unpainted.

This will allow the edges to fuse together.

To make it into a paint consistency, mix the powder with a water based medium, such as Klyr-Fire, Aloe Vera , or any other clear liquid adhesive.

These adhesives will hold the powder in place.

They also dry and fire clear.

There are no exact mixing instructions for this powder, just mix to desired consistency.

Test the mixture on some scrap glass.

Once dry observe how the mixture looks.

If pale add more powder to the mixture, if dull add more medium.

Only the powder that is directly on the glass will stick after firing, so it is important to prepare a good mixture.

This product can also be mixed with other glass fusing objects.

Mixing with enamels or glass powder adds a bit of sparkle to your finished piece.

Hairspray can be used to hold the powders to the glass.

It can be stenciled on to the glass with any standard stencil.

Try using a punch and card stock to make small personalized stencils.

Always test different colors on scrap glass to assure results.

Put a put a few small thin dots of glue or hairspray on a small scrap of glass and then sprinkled on the mica mixture.

Mix the mica powder with Aloe Vera and place it in a needle nosed bottle.

Look in art supply stores for these bottles.

Artist use the bottles to apply masking fluids.

It is also suggested that this mixture could be placed in a syringe with a tip attached, like the ones used to PMC clay.

Any type of bottle that has a fine tip is great for applying this mixture.

This mixture can be used to draw on glass.

Lines or small dots can be made if the tip of the bottle is small enough.

Daub some of the dense blend onto scrap glass, press the scrap onto a glass piece that you want to place a pattern on and then lift off.

There will be tiny ridges that almost imitate the veining in gem stones.

The fine areas will burn away when fired, but the thicker veining will still be there.

Another way to apply this mica is by using a product called Perfect Medium by Ranger Ink.

Perfect Medium comes in a stamp pad and thin and wide markers.

Use less detailed stamps when doing this method.

Stamp the image onto glass then lightly sift the mica powder over the image.

The mica will stick to the Perfect Medium stamped image.

Brush away the excess powder with a soft brush.

Try this procedure on different colors of glass either capped or uncapped.

Try experimenting with this dusty fine powder to create some dazzling fused glass artwork.

Cut a few small square pieces and try different techniques on each square.

This will give you some examples that you can refer to for future firings.






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