High Temp Wire Bail

A high temp wire can be a very nice way to add a bail to a fused glass piece.

Some individuals prefer to use a high temperature wire to hang their fused glass cabochons, as opposed to gluing a fixture onto the back of the glass.

Nichrome wire is the most common type used for making bails in the kiln, and is often referred to as a high temp wire.

The name, Nichrome, is a brand name for a nickel-chromium resistance wire.

This sturdy, heat-tolerant wire has a maximum temperature up to approximately 1700 degrees Fahrenheit.

This makes it ideal for adding loops to your fused jewelry pieces, since it can be fired in the kiln.

It is typically encased between two or more pieces of fused glass.

Nichrome wire is fine for making bails, but it is not easy to obtain a good shine on the finished piece.

It doesn’t seem to stay silver when fired, but seems to turn a dark almost gray color on the heat exposed areas.

There is no claim that this high temperature wire will stay “silver” after exposing it to fusing temperatures.

It fire scales a little bit and turns dark.

If you want silver, try making sterling bails for your fused glass art.

This high temperature wire can be polished after firing to attempt to bring it back up to a nice silver shine.

Use a wire brush attachment on a dremel, or using steel wool.

It's hard to find in general craft stores, but can be purchased on line at your glass fusing supply location.

It can be bent and formed into any shape with jeweler’s pliers.

Usually the wire is bent in a “U” shape and placed between layers of glass.

Fire the glass in a kiln to either a tack fuse or full fuse.

As the glass heats inside the kiln, it will slump and encase the wire into the glass.

The projecting piece of the wire can be used to attach the fused piece to a jewelry finding.






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