Firing Kiln

On this page, we will be discussing the first firing kiln procedure. When firing a kiln you need to watch and control the temperature inside. These steps will help you achieve the desired schedules. These procedures are typically done at temperatures around 1300-1500 degrees Fahrenheit.

For a first firing, it is recommended that you fire the kiln to about 1000 degrees Fahrenheit and hold it there for about 30 minutes. For the first firing, only place the shelf and posts inside the kiln.

There is a refractory coating that is placed on the element grooves in the firebrick lid. As the elements in the lid expand during the first firing, any loose particles or pieces inside the grooves will fall into the empty firing chamber. Once the kiln has cooled, vacuum the lid grooves and the inside of the kiln, being sure to remove any particles that might have landed on the kiln shelf. Then the kiln is ready for future firings.

Keep an eye on the glass in the kiln is an essential part of glass fusing. A good peep hole or glass panel is a great help in seeing what is happening to your project.

Although kilns are hard working pieces of equipment, they don’t stay new looking for long. The steel case can tarnish and small cracks can become visible in the firebricks. This is routine and nothing to get alarmed about. It is an appliance, and pieces of equipment get dirty and soiled during usage.

Even though the firebrick is fragile, it can routinely withstand high temperatures over 2000 degrees Fahrenheit. Correctly taken care of, firebricks can endure hundreds of firings.

So, can you do glass fusing in a ceramic kiln? Yes. The basic difference between the two kilns is that glass kilns usually heat from the top and ceramic kilns heat from the side.

Although your new piece of equipment can seem intimidating at first, it is only a tool and can be easily mastered. Read these simple instructions on the firing kiln procedure and fire up that kiln.

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