Do You Want Bubbles?

You might have been under the concept that air bubbles in fused glass is an undesirable thing. But, after seeing a few pieces where these pockets have been deliberately placed inside a piece of artwork has you thinking differently. Trapping this air inside glass for eternity has begun to appeal to your creative side. Tiny air pockets are very common whenever you fuse glass.

But, instead of trying to prevent these textured shapes, embrace them and include them in your pieces. They can be encouraged to form and can even be placed in designated spots. Yes, you can deliberately trap air between layers of glass.

bubbles, air bubbles

Once you achieve these blisters make sure you keep them there. It is usually preferred to cease the firing prior to the trapped air reaching the surface. When glass reaches the liquid zone, the air pockets start to become rounder in form and begin to travel toward the surface of the glass. If these pockets rise to close to the top surface, the layer will be thin and more fragile. These might not burst while in the kiln, but if the glass is to thin, the chance of breaking and ruining the piece is still possible. If while firing, the temperature continues higher the surface tension of the glass will become lax enough for the air to rise to the surface. Once at the surface, the blister will pop leaving a crater or hole in the glass.

Encouraging and placing air pockets in your fused pieces can be easily brought about. There are several ways this can be accomplished. Try a few of these methods to insert these air pockets to your fused pieces.

  • Copper Mesh Method
  • Bubble Powder Method
  • Baking Soda Method
  • Textured Glass Method
  • Stringers Method
  • Grinder Method
  • Stacking Glass Method

  • Air trapped inside fused glass doesn’t have to be an undesirable occurrence. Air pockets can be purposely added to your fused glass art to insert texture and interest to a piece. Try mixing a few of these methods to achieve some interesting artwork.

    Return from this page to one of the following pages:

    Bubbles to Glass Fusing Made Easy

    Fusing Embellishments

    E-mail Address
    First Name (optional)

    I keep this private.

    Learn Glass Fusing

    Learn More

    Site Affiliate Links

    Delphi Glass